Oil and Gas Activities in Indonesia in 2020

The upstream oil and gas industry of Indonesia invested 10.21 billion US dollars and performed well in 2020 according to SKK Migas, the special task force in charge of upstream oil and gas activities of oil companies in Indonesia.

The oil and gas industry of Indonesia successfully met and even exceeded some of the 2020 targets that were set by the Indonesian government in the following key areas:

  1. Reserve Replacement ratio (RRR).
  2. Oil lifting
  3. Controlling the cost recovery
  4. Revenue intake by the government
  5. Completion of oil and gas projects

RESERVE REPLACEMENT RATIO

The reserve replacement ratio in 2020 is 101.6%. The oil industry added 705 MMBOE of reserve in 2020.  

OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION

The average daily oil lifting in 2020 is 706,000 BOPD. This exceeded the government target of 705,000 BOPD.

However, daily gas production in 2020 is 5461 MMSCFD. This is below the government target of 5556 MMSCFD.

COST RECOVERY

The amount of cost recovery in 2020 is US$ 8.12 billion which is in line with the government expectations.

OIL REVENUE TO GOVERNMENT

The oil industry contributed US$ 8.4 billion of revenues to the Indonesian government. This amount is 41% higher than the expected amount of US$5.86 billion.

COMPLETION OF EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PROJECTS

Fifteen oil and gas projects went on stream in 2020. These new projects added 9182 barrels of oil per day and 111 million SCF of gas per day.

3199 Km of 2D seismic and 1251 Km2 of 3D seismic surveys were completed in 2020.

SKK Migas was active and running in 2020 to keep the oil and gas exploration and production activities at a high level. Here are some of the key actions that SKK Migas undertook in 2020: 

  • SKK Migas signed twenty-four PSC side letters and sixty-one letters of agreement (LoA).
  • The government reduced the prices of gas sold to domestic companies to stimulate economic growth.
  • Allowing oil and gas operators to delay topping up the Abandonment and Site Restoration fund.
  • Eliminating the costs to oil operators of using government assets in their exploration and production activities.
  • Allowing oil companies to accelerate asset appreciation.
  • SKK Migas and Chevron Pacific Indonesia signed the Heads of Agreement to ensure the continuity of a high level of activities such as well drilling and production optimization in the Rokan Block during the final phase of the PSC contract. Chevron will hand over the operatorship of The Rokan block to Pertamina when its production sharing contract expires in August 2021.
  • SKK Migas approved the Plan of Development (POD) submitted by Repsol for the development of the huge Kaliberau gas field having 445 billion SCF of gas reserve in the Sakakemang block. The total investment in this project is estimated at 359 million US dollars.

PERFORMANCE OF THE OIL AND GAS OPERATORS IN 2020

Here are the top nine oil and gas operators who exceeded their oil production targets in 2020.

  • Chevron Pacific Indonesia
  • Pertamina Hulu Mahakam
  • Pertamina Hulu Energi ONWJ  
  • Pertamina Hulu Energi OSES
  • Petrochina International Jabung
  • Medco E & P Natuna
  • Pertamina Hulu Sanga Sanga
  • Medco E&P Rimau
  • JOB Pertamina – Medco Tomori Sulawesi

Here are the top nine oil and gas operators who exceeded their gas production targets in 2020.

  • BP Berau
  • Pertamina Hulu Mahakam
  • Eni Muara Bakau BV
  • JOB Pertamina – Medco Tomori Sulawesi
  • Premier Oil Indonesia
  • Petrochina International Jabung
  • Medco E & P Natuna
  • Kangean Energi Indonesia
  • Pearl Oil (Sebuku)

EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TARGETS FOR 2021

Being optimistic that Indonesia will meet the target of 1 million BOPD and 12 BSCFD of gas by 2030, SKK Migas is committed to keeping oil and gas production high in 2021. Here are its ambitious targets for oil and gas activities in 2021:

  • Daily oil production – 705,000 BOPD. This is the same target as in 2020.
  • The number of exploration wells – 43. This is a significant increase from 28, the actual number of exploration wells drilled in 2020.
  • The number of development wells – 616. This target is much higher compared with the 240 development wells drilled in 2020.
  • Number of workovers – 615
  • Number of well services – 26,431
  • 2-D seismic survey – 3569 Km
  • 3-D seismic survey – 1549 Km2

The Indonesian oil industry performed well in 2020. Mr. Dwi Soetjipto, the head of SKK Migas said: “The year 2020 was a difficult year for many oil operators due to the Covid 19 pandemic and the low oil prices. Nevertheless, the oil industry of Indonesia was able to meet several targets set by the government. Hopefully, this will help the country’s economy.”

This blog article is adapted from “Kinerja Hulu Migas Gemilang Sepanjang 2020” published by SKK Migas on 4 January 2021.

This article is adapted from SKK Migas news by Jamin Djuang – Chief Learning Officer of LDI Training.

The Amazing Rise of Medco Energi

The Belanak FPSO

This year, Medco Energi is celebrating its forty years of continuing successes and presence as one of the leading energy companies in Indonesia and South East Asia.

Medco Energi International became a public company in 1994, and today it operates in eight countries.

It has interests in oil and gas exploration and production, geothermal power generation, gas distribution and trading, and mining.

The Beginning of Medco

Medco Energi has come a long way in a short time since it started as an oil drilling service company in 1980, Meta Epsi Pribumi Drilling Company (MEDCO).

Founded by Mr. Arifin Panigoro, Medco Energi is a trailblazer ever since its beginning.

The Acquisition of Stanvac Indonesia

The first breaks that made Medco became big and successful were the acquisition of Stanvac’s oil and gas assets in South Sumatera in 1995, and the following discovery of the big oil fields in Kaji and Semoga in the Rimau Block, in South Sumatera.

Stanvac Indonesia, set up by Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1912, was one of the oldest and biggest oil companies in Indonesia during the Dutch colonial era.  

The Acquisition of ConocoPhillip’s Interest in West Natuna Sea Block B PSC

The Acquisition of ConocoPhillip’s Interest in West Natuna Sea Block B

Medco Energi further expanded in 2016 when it purchased ConocoPhillips’s 40% interest in the West Natuna Sea Block B and took over the operatorship of the block.

This acquisition added substantial gas and liquids reserves and increased Medco Energi’s daily production by over 35%.

The block is in approximately 300 feet of water and had 11 offshore platforms, four producing subsea fields, and one FPSO – the Belanak FPSO – in addition to two dedicated floating storage and offloading vessels.

The Belanak FPSO was described as one of the most complex FPSO in the world. It was the first offshore liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) facility on a floating vessel in the Asia Pacific region when it was commissioned in 2004.

The fields include the Belanak field, South Belut field, Hiu field, Kerisi field, North Belut field and Bawal field.

The produced natural gas is sold to Singapore and Malaysia through a 654 KM long 28 inch gas pipeline.

Medco Energi also assumed the operatorship of the Onshore Receiving Facility in Singapore following the acquisition.

Acquisition of Ophir Energy

Medco Energi Internasional continued to expand by acquiring Ophir Energy, a London-based independent in 2019.

The acquisition of Ophir Energy increased Medco Energi’s daily oil and gas production by 29% to 110,000 BOE per day.

By taking over the operatorship of Ophir Energy’s offshore Bualuang field in Thailand, Medco Energi became a leading regional oil and gas player in South East Asia.

Epilogue

Besides acquiring producing assets, Medco Energi is also active in exploring for new oil and gas reserves.

Its 2020 exploration drilling campaign in the South Natuna Sea Block B is 100% successful. It tested hydrocarbon in all the four exploration wells it drilled. The wells are Bronang-2, Kaci-2, Terubuk-5, and West Belut-1.

Medco Energi is planning to develop these fields.

As Medco Energi celebrates its 40 years of progress, with its solid management team, it certainly will continue to march toward an even brighter future.

Here is the top management team of Medco Energi.

Muhammad Lutfi – President Commissioner

Hilmi Panigoro – President Director

Roberto Lorato – Chief Executive Officer

Anthony R Mathias – Chief Financial Officer

Ronald Gunawan – Chief Operating Officer

Amri Siahaan – Chief Human Capital and Business Support Officer

Myrta Sri Utami – VP Corporate Planning & IR

Siendy K Wisandana – Head of Legal Counsel and Secretary

Written by Jamin Djuang – Chief Learning Officer of LDI Training and author of the published book The Story of Oil and Gas: How Oil and Gas are Explored, Drilled and Produced.

The Old Dutch Oil Companies in Indonesia

The Balikpapan Refinery – Photo courtesy of Tropenmuseum

Since the early 1900s, with oil discoveries in Sumatera in 1885, Java in 1887, and Kalimantan in 1891, Indonesia has been recognized as an important oil-producing country outside America.

By 1900 there were already 18 oil companies operating in Indonesia. It is interesting to note that only companies registered in Nederland and managed by the Dutch could operate in Indonesia at that time.  The reason for this was up until World War II, Indonesia was under the administration of the Netherlands East Indies (NEI).

These old Dutch oil companies played important roles in putting Indonesia on the world map as a significant producer of crude oil and fuels. They discovered and developed many oilfields in Indonesia, and even built refineries in Sumatera, Java, and Borneo. By 1938, oil production had reached 140,000 barrels per day.

Oil well drilling in Pangkalan Susu, Sumatera, in 1916 by KNPM.

By 1945, the year when Indonesia declared its independence, due to acquisitions and mergers, the number of oil companies had reduced to just four: BPM (Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij), NIAM (Nederlands Indische Aardolie Maatschappij), STANVAC, and CALTEX.

Stanvac and Caltex which were owned by their American parent companies started as Dutch-registered companies.

After 1965, when Pertamina acquired BPM, all the oil companies with Dutch names no longer existed. Nevertheless, their names appeared in many old and new articles and are often cited in research papers.

Since the names of the old Dutch oil companies in Indonesia consisted of long Dutch words, they were often written in their acronyms.

Here is the glossary of the acronyms of some of the old Dutch oil companies that operated in Indonesia in the past. 

BPM – Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij

DPM – Doordsche Petroleum Maatschappij

KNPM – Koninklijke Nederlandsche Petroleum Maatschappij

NIAM – Nederlands Indische Aardolie Maatschappij

SPPM – Sumatera Palembang Petroleum Maatschappij

MEPM – Muara Enim Petroleum Maatschappij

NNGPM – Nederlandsche Nieuw Guinea Petroleum Maatschappij

SVPM – Standard Vacuum Petroleum Maatstchappij

SVTM – Standard Vacuum Tankvaart Maatschappij

NKPM – Nederlandsche Koloniale Petroleum Maatschappij

NPPM – Nederlandsche Pacific Petroleum Maatschappij 

SMOB – Steenkolen Maatschappij Oost Borneo

NIIHM – Nederlandch Indisch Industrie en Handel Maatschappij

If you are interested in the history of oil in Indonesia, please read The Three Big Oil Companies in Indonesia before 1945.  

This article is written by Jamin Djuang – Chief Learning Officer of LDI Training and author of The Story of Oil and Gas: How Oil and Gas Are Explored, Drilled and Produced.

The Top 10 Crude Oil Producing Companies in Indonesia in 2018

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The photo showed the drilling activity at the West Seno field, the first deepwater field in Indonesia. The photo was taken by Dr. Tony Tirta.

The average crude oil production in Indonesia in 2018 is 803,000 barrels per day according to SKK Migas of Indonesia.

Here are the top ten crude oil-producing companies in Indonesia in 2018.

Chevron Pacific Indonesia – 209,000 BOPD

Chevron is the biggest oil producer in Indonesia in 2018 and has been a leading oil producer in Indonesia for more than 90 years. It started operating in Indonesia in 1924 under Standard Oil Company of California (SOCAL).

Chevron operated oilfields in Sumatera and East Kalimantan. It’s East Kalimantan assets came from the acquisition of Unocal in 2005. Chevron handed back all the assets in East Kalimantan to the Indonesia government on October 24, 2018, after 50 years of operation under Unocal and Chevron.

Currently, Chevron’s oil production comes mainly from the oil fields located in Riau, Sumatera under the Rokan Production Sharing Contract. The biggest oil field in the Rokan PSC is the Duri field which has been under steam-flood since 1985 and is one of the largest steam flood projects in the world. Minas is another giant oil field that Chevron discovered and operated in the Rokan Block.

ExxonMobil Cepu Ltd – 208,000 BOPD

ExxonMobil Cepu Ltd is the operator of the Cepu block located in Central Java and East Java. The Cepu Cooperation Contract (KKS) was signed on 17 September 2005 and will continue until 2035. ExxonMobil holds a 45% interest in the Cepu block.

ExxonMobil started exploration in 1999, and the oil from the Banyu Urip field started to flow in December 2008.

Pertamina EP – 79,000 BOPD

Pertamina EP operated 21 oil and gas fields located in various parts of Indonesia. These oilfields are managed under five asset groups based on their geographical locations.

Located in North Sumatera and some parts of South Sumatera, the Asset One oilfields include Rantau Field, Pangkalan Susu Field, Lirik Field, Jambi Field, dan Ramba Field.

Located in South Sumatera, the Asset Two oilfields include Prabumulih Field, Pendopo Field, Limau Field dan Adera Field.

Located in West Jawa, the oilfields included in Asset Three are Subang Field, Jatibarang Field dan Tambun Field.

Located in Central and East Jawa, the Asset Four oilfields include Cepu Field, Poleng Field dan Matindok Field.

Located in the eastern part of Indonesia, the oilfields in Asset Five are Sangatta Field, Bunyu Field, Tanjung Field, Sangasanga Field, Tarakan Field dan Papua Field.

Pertamina Hulu Mahakam – 42,000 BOPD

Pertamina Hulu Mahakam became the operator of the oil and gas fields located in the Mahakam Block on 1 January 2018. The fields were previously discovered and operated by Total along with Inpex as its partner. They acquired the block in 1966.

Several giant oil and gas fields are located in this block such as the Handil field, the Tunu field, and the Peciko field.

Pertamina Hulu Energi OSES (Offshore South East Sumatera) – 30,000 BOPD

Pertamina Hulu Energi OSES became the operator of the oil fields in Block South East Sumatera on September 6, 2018. The fields were previously operated by CNOOC, China National Offshore Oil Company.

Pertamina Hulu Energi ONWJ – 29,000 BOPD

Pertamina Hulu Energi ONWJ (PHE ONWJ) is currently the operator of the  Offshore North West Java (ONWJ) production sharing contract following the change of company ownership from BP to Pertamina in July 2009.

The contract area, located in the Java Sea, covers an area of approximately 8,300 square kilometers – stretching from the North of Cirebon to Kepulauan Seribu.

The giant Ardjuna field is located in this Production Sharing Contract area. It was discovered by ARCO – Atlantic Richfield Company –  in 1969 and operated by ARCO until BP – British Petroleum – acquired ARCO in 2000.

The production facilities consist of 670 wells, 170 shallow water platforms, 40 processing and service facilities and some 1,600 kilometers of sub-sea pipeline.

Medco EP Natuna – 16,000 BOPD

Medco EP Natuna, a subsidiary of Medco Energi, is the operator of the South Natuna Sea Block B. The field was initially operated by ConocoPhillips until Medco Energi acquired it in 2016.

Besides producing oil, Medco EP Natuna also supplies gas to Singapore using a 656 KM long 28” subsea pipeline.

Petronas Carigali (Ketapang) – 15,000 BOPD

Petronas Carigali Ketapang operates the Bukit Tua Field located in the Ketapang Block in East Java. Bukit Tua is an oil field but with a significant amount of associated gas. The offshore field is situated at a water depth of about 57 m.

The production facilities consist of wellhead platforms, an FPSO – Floating Production, Storage and Offloading – and onshore receiving facilities (ORF) in Gresik.

PetroChina International Jabung – 14,000 BOPD

PetroChina International Jabung operates the prolific Jabung Block located in Jambi in Central Sumatera.

The company produces crude oil, condensate, LPG and gas. PetroChina supplies gas to Singapore using a 450 KM long subsea pipeline.

An interesting aspect of the block is that PetroChina discovered the fractured basement rock contains a significant quantity of gas that can flow at significant rates.

Pertamina Hulu Kalimantan Timur – 13,000 BOPD

Pertamina Hulu Kalimantan Timur operates the East Kalimantan-Attaka Work Area. Chevron was the previous operator of the work area until it handed over the operatorship to Pertamina on October 25, 2018.

Attaka, the famous giant oil field is located in this block. The Attaka field was discovered and operated by Unocal until Chevron acquired it in 2005.

The oil fields in this work area are in the late declining phase. Around one billion barrels of oil and 3 TCF of gas have been produced from this work area.

This article was written by Jamin Djuang, a published author of “The Story of Oil and Gas: How Oil and Gas Are Explored, Drilled and Produced” for readers who have not seen an oil field.

The World Top Ten Proven Oil Reserves

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According to EIA, the US Energy Information Agency, the top ten countries with the largest amount of proven oil reserves in 2017 are:

  1. Venezuela – 300 billion barrels
  2. Saudi Arabia – 266 billion barrels
  3. Canada – 170 billion barrels
  4. Iran – 158 billion barrels
  5. Iraq – 142 billion barrels
  6. Kuwait – 101 billion barrels
  7. UAE – 98 billion barrels
  8. Russia – 80 billion barrels
  9. Libya – 48 billion barrels
  10. Nigeria – 37 billion barrels

The United States, currently the largest oil producer in the world, is ranked at number eleven with proven oil reserves of 35 billion barrels of oil. Most of the increases in oil production in the US come from the production of shale oil. The US is the world leader in oil shale drilling.

It is interesting that although Venezuela has the most oil in the ground, it is no longer one of the top ten oil producers in the world.

 

The World Top 10 Oil Producers

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Offshore oil and gas production and processing platforms and facility.

 

In 2018, daily world oil production amounts to around 92 million barrels per day, increasing slightly 0.7% from previous year.

Here are the world top ten oil producers according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) in 2017:

  1. USA – 15.6 Million barrels of oil per day
  2. Saudi Arabia – 12.1 Million BOPD
  3. Russia – 11.2 Million BOPD
  4. Canada – 5.0 Million BOPD
  5. China – 4.8 Million BOPD
  6. Iran – 4.7 Million BOPD
  7. Iraq – 4.5 Million BOPD
  8. UAE – 3.7 Million BOPD
  9. Brazil – 3.4 Million BOPD
  10. Kuwait – 2.9 Million BOPD

The USA is the largest oil producer in the world in 2017. The production of crude oil in the USA is expected to increase into 2019. The USA is also the world’s largest consumer of oil. Its daily oil consumption in 2019 is projected to increase by 340,000 barrels to 20.65 million barrels, according to EIA.

EIA reported on 21 December 2018 United States produced a total of 16.3 million barrels per day of crude oil and natural gas liquids in November 2018.  This total production consists of 11.7 million BPD of crude oil and 4.6 BPD of natural gas liquids or NGL.

Saudi Arabia, on the other hand, is the largest oil exporting country. As the most well-known and influential oil producer, it has 260 billion barrels of oil reserves, which is about 22% of the world’s oil reserves.

Why synthetic lubricating oil lasts longer than mineral oil?

car-engine-motor-clean-customized-159293

The traditional oil we use to lubricate our car engine is called mineral oil because it is derived from crude oil. Mineral oil consists of hydrocarbon molecules extracted from the distillation of crude oil. They are mainly alkanes in the range of C-15 to C- 40.

An alkane is a saturated hydrocarbon consisting of only carbon and hydrogen atoms. Also called paraffin, it has the general formula of CnH2n+2. The simplest alkane is methane, CH4, where the n=1.

Due to the chemical and physical properties of the hydrocarbon alkanes, they have limited resistance to oxidation and thermal breakdown at very high temperature.

Synthetic oil, on the other hand, consists of synthetic molecules. They are artificially made and specially designed to provide excellent lubrication and stability at very high and also at low temperature. Since these synthetic molecules do not deteriorate easily, they can last longer than mineral oil even at extreme conditions in an engine.

Synthetic oil is more expensive than mineral oil, nevertheless, it is a superior lubricant to keep your car healthy. With mineral oil, it is recommended you change the oil every 5000 to 10,000 miles. Whereas using synthetic oil, you may change the oil every 20,000 miles.

Finally, it is important to note regardless of the type of oil you use, you should change your engine oil based on the recommended interval because it gets contaminated with combustion by-products that accumulate at about the same rate regardless of oil type.

Digital Rock Physics – Core Analysis Using Digital Technology

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Offshore oil and gas processing platform,

In the last decade, there has been an important breakthrough in how petroleum engineers and geoscientists obtained oil and gas reservoir rock properties.

Traditionally, reservoir rock properties or petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution, effective and relative permeability, capillary pressure, water saturation and other reservoir parameters are determined from Special Core Analysis (SCAL), electric logs and well pressure transient tests. In recent years, a new method in determining rock properties using Digital Rock Physics (DRP) has gained serious attention from petroleum engineers, petro-physicists and geoscientists.

What is digital rock physics? Digital rock physics is also referred to as digital core analysis. In this measurement method, high-resolution digital images of the rock pores and mineral grains of selected reservoir core samples are made and analyzed. These images are usually 3D digital X-ray micro-tomographic images. The rock properties are then determined using numerical simulation at the pore scale.

The significant benefit of this new DRP technology is now a large number of complex reservoir parameters can be determined faster and more accurately than the traditional laboratory measurements or well testing methods.

Using the DRP technology to determine the rock properties, oil and gas companies can now analyze their reservoir capacity and performance more accurately and sooner during the field evaluation and development phase. This, in turn, allows them to develop and manage their reservoirs more efficiently and economically.

Source – Digital Rock Physics for Fast and Accurate Special Core Analysis in Carbonates – A Chapter in New Technologies in the Oil and Gas Industry – By  Mohammed Zubair Kalam

Gas Handling, Conditioning and Processing

This gas handling, conditioning and processing course is designed and presented by Dr Maurice Stewart to teach you how to design, select, specify, install, test and trouble-shoot your gas processing facilities.

This gas handling, conditioning and processing course has been attended by thousands of oil and gas professionals since Dr Maurice Stewart began teaching it more than 20 years ago. Dr Stewart is a co-author of a widely acclaimed “Surface Production Operations: Design of Gas Handling Facilities” along with Ken Arnold.

By attending this course, participants will:

1. Know the important parameters in designing, selecting, installing, operating and trouble-shooting gas handling, conditioning and processing facilities.
2. Understand the uncertainties and assumptions inherent in designing and operating the equipment in these systems and the limitations, advantages and disadvantages associated with their use.
3. Learn how to size, select, specify, operate, maintain, test and trouble-shoot surface equipment used with the handling, conditioning and processing of natural gas and associated liquids such as separators, heat exchangers, absorption and fractionation systems, dehydration systems, refrigeration, low temperature separation units, JT plants and compression systems.
4. Know how to evaluate and choose the correct process for a given situation.

Course Content

In this 5-day course, Dr Maurice Stewart will cover the following topics:
• Fluid properties, basic gas laws and phase behaviour
• Well Configurations, surface safety systems (SSS) and emergency support systems (ESS)
• Gas Processing systems, selection and planning
• Water-hydrocarbon phase behaviour, hydrate formation prevention and inhibition
• Heat transfer theory and process heat duty
• Heat exchangers: configurations, selection and sizing
• Gas-liquid separation and factors affecting separation
• Types of separators and scrubbers, and their construction
• Gas-liquid separators and sizing
• Liquid-liquid separators and sizing
• Three phase separator sizing
• Pressure vessels: the internals, mechanical design and safety factors
• Separator operating problems and practical solutions
• Gas compression theory, compression ratio and number of stages
• Compressor selection: centrifugal compressors vs. reciprocating compressors
• Vapor recovery units, screw compressors and vane compressors
• Compression station design and safety systems
• Performance curves for reciprocating compressors
• Absorption process and absorbers
• Adsorption process and adsorbers
• Glycol gas dehydration unit design and operation
• Glycol unit operating variables and trouble shooting
• Glycol selection and glycol regeneration
• Acid gas sweetening processes and selection
• Fractionation, refrigeration plants, expander plants and J-T plants
• Process control and safety systems

Course Materials

Participants will receive the following course materials:
1. The 3rd Edition of Volume 2 of the widely acclaimed “Surface Production Operations: Design of Gas Handling Facilities” written by Ken Arnold and Dr Maurice Stewart. This textbook continues to be the standard for industry and has been used by thousands since its first printing over fifteen years ago.
2. A comprehensive set of lecture notes for after course reading and reference
3. An extensive set of practical in-class “case study” exercises developed by Dr Stewart that will be used to emphasize the design and “trouble-shooting” pitfalls often encountered in the industry.

Who Should Attend

• Facility engineers, production engineers, design and construction engineers, team leaders, operations engineers, maintenance team leaders/engineers and other personnel who are or will be responsible for the designing, selecting, sizing, specifying, installing, testing, operating and maintaining gas handling facilities, gas plant facilities and gas pipelines.
• Experienced professionals who want to review or broaden their understanding of gas handling, conditioning and processing facilities and gas pipeline operation and maintenance.
• Professionals with little to moderate experience with the handling or processing of natural gas and associated liquids.

If you like to receive a pdf file of this course outline, please contact us.

Registration Information

Course date: November 25-29, 2019
Location: Singapore
Tuition: US$4500

Registration Form

If you or your people want to attend this course, please register HERE.

Contact information
Email: lditrain@singnet.com.sg
Website: https://oilandgascourses.org

Production Safety Systems

A 5-day course by Dr. Maurice Stewart incorporating the new 2017 8th Edition of API RP 14C, the new API RP 17V 1st Edition, API RP 14J, API RP 500/505, API RP 520/521/2000, IEC 61508-2 and IEC 61508-3.

This intense Production Safety Systems course presents a systematization of proven practices for providing a safety system for onshore and offshore production facilities. Thousands of oil and gas professionals have attended this course since it was offered by Dr. Maurice Stewart more than 20 years ago.

This production safety systems course has been updated to reflect the changes provided in the new API RP 14C and the API RP 17V. In this course, you will learn the latest concepts, methods and practices that will make your facility operationally safe.

What You’ll Learn

• Provisions for designing, installing and testing both safety and non-marine emergency support systems (ESSs) on both onshore and offshore production facilities.
• Concepts of a facility safety system and outline production methods and requirements of the system.
• Guidance on how safety analysis methods can be used to determine safety requirements to protect common process components from the surface wellhead and/or topside boarding valve and for subsea systems including all process components from the wellhead and surface controlled subsurface safety valve (SCSSV) to upstream of the boarding shutdown valve. (Note: The shutdown valve is within the scope of API RP 17V for gas injection, water injection, gas lift systems and chemical injections.)
• The importance of “Safety Concept,” “Safety Reviews,” and “EB-HAZOPs.”
• A method to document and verify process safety system functions, i.e., safety analysis function evaluation (SAFE chart).
• Design guidance for ancillary systems such as pneumatic supply systems and liquid containment systems.
• A uniform method of identifying and symbolizing safety devices.
• Procedures for testing common safety devices with recommendations for test data and acceptable test tolerances.
• The Principles of Safe Facility Design and Operation, specifically, how to Contain Hydrocarbons, Prevent Ignition, Prevent Fire Escalation and Provide Personnel Protection and Escape.
• The Principles of Plant Layout Partitioning and how to partition a plant into Fire Zones, Restricted Areas and Impacted Areas thereby minimizing the Risk to Radiation, Explosion, Noise and Toxicity.
• How to determine Electrical Hazardous (Classified) Locations and determine what Electrical Equipment should be installed in these locations,
• The purpose of Surface Safety Systems, specifically, the Emergency Shut-down System, Emergency Depressurization System, Fire and Gas Detection Systems and High Integrity Protection Systems,
• The Objectives, Types, Location and Placement of Fire and Gas Detection Systems.
• The Objectives, Types and Performance of Active and Passive Fire Protection Systems.
• The Function, Types, Selection and layout of Vent, Flare and Relief Systems to minimize the effects of Radiation, Flammable Gas Dispersion and Toxic Gas Dispersion.
• The function and design considerations of Liquid Drainage Systems
• How to determine piping “spec breaks”.
• How to evaluate workplace and operating/maintenance procedures for “hidden” hazards.
• How to effectively design facilities and work areas to reduce human errors and improve performance.

Course Content

• Principles of safe facility design
• Ignition prevention
• Fire escalation prevention
• Personnel protection and escape
• Installation layout
• Electrical installations in hazardous (classified) areas
• Safety systems
• Pressure ratings and Specification breaks
• High Integrity Pressure Protection Systems (HIPPS)
• Safety system and ESS bypassing
• Onshore gathering station safety systems
• Fire and gas detection systems
• Active and passive fire protection
• Relief, vent and flare systems
• Liquid drainage systems
• Electrical Area Classification

Who Should Attend

This workshop is specifically targeted for professionals and engineers who are involved in safety or production operations and who want to:

1. Develop a better understanding of the effectiveness of existing Production Safety System initiatives at existing oil and gas facilities.
2. Appreciate the main steps contemplated in the Safe Design of a plant or facility,
3. Better understand the scope and functioning of the various safety related equipment installed onshore, offshore and subsea.
4. Review or broaden their understanding of how to conduct a safety analysis, Experience-Based HAZOP and how to install electrical equipment in hazardous (Classified) locations.
5. Other professionals who want to develop a better understanding of how to conduct a Safety Analysis, EB-HAZOPs and install electrical equipment in hazardous (Classified) locations.

Course Materials

• Each participant will receive a comprehensive set of worksheets and checklists to aid them in conducting a safety analysis
• Each participant will receive a comprehensive set of lecture notes for after course reading and reference
• An extensive set of practical in-class “case study” exercises specially designed by Dr. Maurice Stewart that emphasizes the design and “trouble-shooting” pitfalls often encountered in the industry.

If you like to receive a pdf file of this course outline, please contact us.

Registration Information

Course date : December 10-14, 2018
Location : Singapore
Tuition : US$4500

Registration Form

If you or your people want to attend this course, please register HERE.

Contact information

LDI Training Pte Ltd
369 Holland Road #02-04
Singapore 278640

Email : lditrain@singnet.com.sg
Website : https://oilandgascourses.org