Geothermal Drilling by The Government of Indonesia

The Indonesia government will drill geothermal exploration wells in 20 geothermal work areas in Indonesia beginning in 2020 until 2024, according to Ida Nuryatin Finahari, Director of Geothermal in the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources.

The purpose of this initiative is to gather information on the geothermal potentials in each work area and to pass this information to potential investors.

The Indonesia government hopes this four year project will stimulate the interests of investors and accelerate the development of geothermal energy in Indonesia.

Here are the twenty geothermal work area where the government of Indonesia will drill exploration wells.

  • Lokop in Aceh
  • Sipoholon Ria Ria in North Sumatera
  • Sajau in North Kalimantan
  • Bora Pulu in Central Sulawesi
  • Marana in Central Sulawesi
  • Bittuang in South Sulawesi
  • Limbong in South Sulawesi
  • Jailolo in North Maluku
  • Banda Baru in Maluku
  • Nage in NTT (Nusa Tenggara Timur)
  • Maritaing in NTT
  • Sembalun in NTB (Nusa Tenggara Barat)
  • Gunung Batur – Kintamani in Bali
  • Guci in Central Java
  • Cisolok Cisukarame in West Java
  • Gunung Galunggung in West Java
  • Gunung Tampomas in West Java
  • Gunung Ciremai in West Java
  • Gunung Papandayan in West Java
  • Gunung Endut in Banten

If you want to understand how your geothermal reservoirs work and how to optimize them, Dr. Roland N. Horne will teach an online Geothermal Reservoir Engineering course on 6-9 October 2020.

About Dr. Roland N. Horne

 

Roland Horne 2018_03-1
Dr. Roland N. Horne

Dr. Roland N. Horne is the Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, and Senior Fellow in the Precourt Institute for Energy. He was also formerly Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department from 1995 to 2006.

He holds BE, Ph.D. and DSc degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, all in Engineering Science.

Roland Horne is well recognized as an expert in geothermal resources. He received Geothermal Special Achievement Award from Geothermal Resources Council in 2015. He is the Technical Programme Chair of World Geothermal Congress 2020 in Reykjavik and a member of the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) Board of Directors.

Dr. Horne is also well known for his work in well test interpretation, production optimization, and analysis of fractured reservoirs.

He is an internationally-recognized expert in the area of well test analysis and has twice been an SPE Distinguished Lecturer on well-testing subjects.

Under him, more than 50 people have obtained Ph.D. degrees at Stanford University.  Currently, Stanford University is recognized as one of the top schools in the world for the study of well test interpretation.

Prof. Roland Horne has written more than 90 technical papers, is the author of the book Modern Well Test Analysis and co-author of the book Discrete Fracture Network Modeling of Hydraulic Stimulation. He is an SPE Honorary Member, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering in the USA.

Prof. Horne will conduct a 4-day webinar – Geothermal Reservoir Engineering– in October 6-9, 2020. If you want more information about this course, please contact LDI Training at lditrain@singnet.com.sg.

He also conducts a 5-day Modern Well Test Analysis course. This highly regarded course has been attended by thousands of oil and gas, as well as geothermal professionals in many countries for more than 20 years. If you want more information about the course, please contact LDI Training at lditrain@singnet.com.sg.

Lava Laze of Kilauea

 

Watch this spectacular USGS video showing lava laze formed by the lava of Kilauea volcano flowing into ocean at Kapoho bay on June 4, 2018.

The lava is from Kilauea Volcano’s lower east Rift Zone entering the ocean. The ocean entry is about a half-mile wide. The flow sends a large laze plume into the air along the coast.

 

What is lava laze?

When the lava flow goes into the ocean water, it boils the water and creates a white acidic plume. That’s laze.

“It’s a complex chemical reaction that occurs between the lava flow and seawater,” said Wendy Stovall, a volcanologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. “It creates a mixture of condensed acidic steam, hydrochloric acid gas and tiny shards of volcanic glass.”

From the air, the plume looks like exhaust from a factory or the white smoke released during a forest fire.

If you’re underneath the plume, a light sprinkle of rain as corrosive as battery acid can fall on you. The acid can burn your skin, irritate your eyes and make it difficult to breathe. In rare cases, the damage can be permanent.

Source: LA Times article by Heidi Chang

Geothermal Plants near a Volcano

Geothermal plants can be safely situated near a volcano, says Dr. Roland Horne, Thomas Davies Barrow Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy at Standord University.

You can read the outstanding article from Stanford University titled Geothermal at the foot of Kilauea on this and on the recent volcano eruption of Mt. Kilauea in Hawaii at https://earth.stanford.edu/news/geothermal-foot-kilauea?linkId=52195066.

In this article, Dr. Roland Horne discusses geothermal energy in the face of natural hazards and a way to tap the earth’s heat far from volcanoes in the future.

I highly recommend you read the article that I mention above. In this article you can also watch the awesome lava flow from a fissure of Mt. Kilauea on May 19, 2018 and learn about Stanford University’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences.